Teachers Zone

The 2017 Sneezesafe® program is now in schools!

 

In this section you will find detailed lesson activities to download and additional collateral that will support the program in the classroom and at home.

This section includes lesson plans to teach children how to be Sneezesafe®. These range in suitability for year levels from Foundation to Years 5, 6 and 7.

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Lesson

1

Germs on the move

Help STOP the spread of cold and flu viruses in your classroom – how germs spread

 

Learning purpose:

  • Teach recommended health guidelines to stop the spread of viruses
  • Learn the correct way to use a tissue

Recommended Year levels
Foundation to Year 1

Introduction

Colds are bad because they make us feel unwell. Today we are going to learn how they can help people, friends and family, to stop catching colds. Germs are tiny living things all around us. They’re so small we can’t see them but they’re in the air, on our hands and on objects. Some germs are cold germs. If we get cold germs in our bodies, we can get a cold and feel unwell. People who have colds can spread these germs when they sneeze or wipe their nose. We can stop cold germs by using tissues and washing our hands.

We are now going to learn how to use a tissue to stop germs spreading and that there will be a special sticker for everyone who learns to use a tissue properly.

 

Students should learn to do all of the following:

  • Start with a clean tissue. Open the tissue.
  • Hold the tissue gently against both nostrils and blow hard, keeping your mouth closed.
  • Fold the tissue over and throw it in the bin.
  • Wash your hands.


Activities

Activity 1: Cold and flu germs travel by air


You will need:

  • Water spray bottle
  • Food dye (optional)

 

What to do:

  • Fill an empty, clean spray bottle with water.
  • Simulate the spread of a sneeze by spraying into the air, reaching surfaces and people.
  • Spray into a tissue to show how a tissue catches all of the water (for this part you could add blue food dye to show more clearly).
  • Explain that this is how germs spread and how important it is to use a tissue to cough and sneeze

 

Activity 2: Cold and flu germs travel by touch


You will need:

  • Talcum powder
  • Paint or gel

What to do:

  • Show how germs spread when hands are not washed straight after coughing and sneezing.
  • One pupil puts powder, paint or gel on their right hand.
  • The same pupil shakes hands with 3 pupils and those 3 pupils shake hands with 3 others. Continue until all hands have been shaken.
  • Take video of the children as they are doing this and show it back to them.
  • Explain how easily cold and flu germs can spread. Even though only one student started out being ‘infected’, not washing their hands will ‘infect’ others easily.

Lesson

2

Cover and smother!

Help STOP the spread of Cold and Flu viruses in your classroom – cover your mouth

 

Learning purpose:

  • Teach recommended health guidelines to stop the spread of viruses
  • Recognise and practice correct respiratory hygiene

Recommended Year levels
Foundation to Year 2

Introduction

Colds are bad because they make us feel unwell. Explain how today we are going to learn how they can help people, friends and family, to stop catching colds. Germs are tiny living things all around us. They’re so small we can’t see them but they’re in the air, on our hands and on objects.

 

Some germs are cold germs. If we get cold germs in our bodies we can get a cold and feel unwell. People who have colds spread these germs when they sneeze or wipe their nose. But we can stop cold germs by using tissues!

 

We are going to learn how to use a tissue to stop germs spreading and that there will be a special sticker for everyone who learns to use a tissue properly.

 

Students should learn to do all of the following:

  • Start with a clean tissue. Open the tissue.
  • Hold the tissue against both nostrils and blow hard, keeping your mouth closed.
  • Fold the tissue over and throw it in the bin. Wash your hands.


Activities

Activity 1: Cover your mouth and nose


  • Take a digital picture of each child, or pair each child up and take each other’s image.
  • Print out on A4 paper; alternatively have the children draw a picture of their face onto art paper.
  • Then have each child trace a handprint of their hand onto art paper and cut out.
  • Use a tissue and crumple it over the mouth and nose (as if the image was blowing their nose).
  • Then glue the hand cut-out over the tissue, in the position which a child might use if they were using a tissue.
  • Write a sentence underneath about good SNEEZESAFE® habits.
  • Laminate and display around the classroom as a reminder during colds and flu season.

 

Activity 2: Here’s one we made before


  • Put students in pairs to play the roles of Catch it Kate and Wash it Will.
  • Using the class tablets, they may record a short video message showing the correct way to Catch it, Bin it, Wash it.
  • Can they imagine another character who might also be included e.g. George the Germ?

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Lesson

3

Catch it!

Help STOP the spread of Cold and Flu viruses in your classroom – sneezes

 

Learning purpose:

  • Teach recommended health guidelines to help stop the spread of viruses
  • Understand what happens to our body when we sneeze

Recommended Year levels
Years 1, 2 or 3

What happens when we sneeze?

When the inside of your nose gets a tickle, a message is sent to a special part of your brain called the sneeze centre. It then sends a message to all the muscles that have to work together to create the amazingly complicated process we call the sneeze.
Some of the muscles involved are the abdominal muscles, the chest muscles, the diaphragm, the muscles that control your voice and the muscles in the back of your throat. And don’t forget about the eye lid muscles! Did you know that you close your eyes when you sneeze?!

 

It’s the job of the sneeze centre to make all these muscles work together, in just the right order to send that irritation flying out of your nose at high speed – over 160km an hour – that’s as fast as a Roger Federer tennis serve! Sneezes can be caused by dust, cold air, pepper, an allergy to pet hair, sunlight and of course, by a cold virus. The virus irritates your nose and when you sneeze microscopic cold bacteria attaches itself to all that water vapour exploding from your nose.


Activities

Activity 1: Cloze activity


Fill in the missing words

sneezes    sick    tissue    wash    cough    160   virus     hand    (8 words)

 

  1. You can get sick if someone who is sick _ _ _ _ _ _ _ on you.
  2. You should always _ _ _ _ your hands after sneezing.
  3. You sneeze at speeds of about _ _ _ kilometres per hour.
  4. Throw your _ _ _ _ _ _ in the bin after using.
  5. Cover your mouth when you _ _ _ _ _.
  6. Germs can make you _ _ _ _.
  7. Don’t wipe your nose with your _ _ _ _.
  8. The cold _ _ _ _ _ spreads to other people, attached to the water sprayed from your nose when you sneeze.

 

Activity 2: Draw a picture of what happens when you sneeze

 

Lesson

4

Micro-organisms

Help STOP the spread of Cold and Flu viruses in your classroom – tiny living creatures

 

Learning purpose:

  • Teach recommended health guidelines to help stop the spread of viruses
  • Introduce the difference between germs and viruses

Recommended Year levels
Years 3 and 4

Introduction | Life processes and living things

Micro-organisms are tiny living things:

  • Micro-organisms are so small that you can’t see them without a strong microscope.
  • Bacteria and viruses are micro-organisms and enter the body through breathing in, drinking or eating.
  • Harmful micro-organisms can cause illness.
  • The flu is caused by the influenza virus.
  • There are more than 200 viruses that cause colds.
  • Cold and flu viruses are spread through: coughs, sneezes and touching infected people or objects.

Sneezesafe® Fun Facts

  • Your body can sneeze at over 100 miles an hour (160 kilometres per hour), faster than a car travels on the road unless you’re at a racetrack!
  • Once you’ve been in contact with a cold virus, it takes 2 to 3 days for cold symptoms to begin.
  • About 3,000 droplets can fly out of your mouth when you cough.
  • About 40,000 droplets can fly out of your mouth when you sneeze.
  • If a person is ill, a single cough may contain over two hundred million tiny germs.
  • Almost everyone closes their eyes when they sneeze.
  • You use many different muscles in the body when you sneeze, such as your tummy, chest, throat and eyelids.


Activities

Activity 1: Fun Facts- Are these sentences true or false?


  • Most micro-organisms cannot be seen with a microscope.
  • All micro-organisms are harmless.
  • Some micro-organisms can cause illness.
  • Bacteria and viruses are both types of micro-organisms.
  • Viruses can spread through coughs and sneezes.
  • Micro-organisms cannot spread through the air.
  • Using a tissue when you cough and sneeze can help stop the spread of viruses.

 

Activity 2: Make a picture dictionary


Find an image or clip art that represents these words (or use the Fun Facts). Try Power Point or Publisher to present your work.

  • Bacteria
  • Microbe
  • Micro-organism
  • Virus
  • Germ
  • Breathe
  • Tissue
  • Sneeze
  • Cough

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Lesson

5

Wash it!

Help STOP the spread of Cold and Flu viruses in your classroom – handwashing

 

Learning purpose:

  • Teach recommended health guidelines to stop the spread of viruses.
  • Understand how handwashing can prevent germs and viruses spreading

Recommended Year levels
Years 3 and 4

Introduction | Handwashing the correct way

Do you sing Happy Birthday in your class? Do you sing it twice, once for luck?! That’s how long it takes to wash the germs thoroughly away from your hands (or about 15 seconds).

Here’s an 8-step guide that will leave your hands squeaky clean.
First, wet your hands with running water, turn off the tap and lather up that soap.

  1. Rub palm to palm
  2. Between your fingers
  3. Back of your hands
  4. Bottom of your thumbs
  5. Back of your fingers
  6. Twirl your fingernails in the middle of each palm
  7. Last but not least, wash your wrists
  8. Rinse and dry

And here’s a cool video on washing your hands – Wash your Hands by the Preschool Popstars


Activities

Activity 1: Storyboard sequencing


Children find and print images of the following (or teacher-supplied, sourced as screen grabs from SNEEZESAFE® online collateral).

  • child washing hands
  • child coughing
  • child eating food after sneezing
  • child binning tissue
  • child blowing nose with tissue
  • child sneezing over their friend

Order the sequence and create an A3 poster (tryPower Point or Publisher). Write a sentence underneath each picture using do’s and don’ts of staying SNEEZESAFE®.


Alternatively

Give children one sheet each containing jumbled images for them to cut and paste onto A3 paper.

 

Activity 2: Billy Gorilly


Watch this clip from Billy Gorilly Kids TV

 

Create your own handwashing message from Catch it Kate and Wash it Will, using an iPad stopmotion app (e.g. Smoovie or StoMo).

 

You will need playdough to create the characters, or you could use plastic figurines such as Lego.

Lesson

6

Atchoo!

Help STOP the spread of cold and flu viruses in your classroom – catching a cold

 

Learning purpose:

  • Teach recommended health guidelines to help stop the spread of viruses.
  • Describe what happens to your body when you catch a cold

Recommended Year levels
Years 5, 6 and 7

Introduction | What happens when you catch a cold or flu?

Do you know that there are over 200 viruses that can make you feel sick with a cold? Despite what some people might say, you don’t catch a cold from feeling cold – the virus has to be there too!


Watch

Flu attack! How a virus invades your body

Please cover your mouth!


Activities

Activity 1: Small group work


List the symptoms e.g. scratchy throat, headache, runny nose, sneezing, temperature etc and put them in the order that you might experience when you are feeling unwell.

 

Activity 2: The whole class


  • Share your list with the class and agree on the order of symptoms.
  • Show the class a digital thermometer, and talk about ‘temperature’ – what is normal (37ºC), what is high (above 38ºC for 24 hours) and when to see the doctor.
  • Using the book-marked websites, book resources and video clips, have students choose one of the following activities:
    • Using Smart Art, SlideShow or similar, create a flow chart which shows the symptoms of a cold and how it progresses in one person.
    • Create a quiz or survey using apps such as Polar or Polldaddy which show the difference between a common cold and influenza.
    • Using toondoo.com, goanimate4schools.com, chogger.com (or similar) create the story of a sneeze as it spreads germs from one student to the next!
  • Include what to do to prevent germs spreading and be SNEEZESAFE®.

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Lesson

7

When cold bugs attack!

Help STOP the spread of cold and flu viruses in your classroom – cold and flu symptoms

 

Learning purpose:

  • Teach recommended health guidelines to help stop the spread of viruses
  • Describe what happens to your body when you catch a cold

Recommended Year levels
Years 5 , 6 and 7

What should you do to help the symptoms of a cold or the flu?

Oh dear, despite making sure that you have caught it, binned it and washed it – somehow you have still caught a cold and
feel very unwell! Don’t worry, there are things that you can do to help yourself recover fast from illness.


WATCH
Awkward moments when you’re sick!


Activities

Activity 1: Tell a story in 5 photos


A five photo story is a collection of five images which tell a story without using any text, audio or video. The five photos ‘stand alone’ as a story. Pixntell is a useful app for this, or try something as simple as Slideshare.

  1. Planning – before taking images (or finding online), have students create a storyboard of the sequence of the images.
  2. Post images into app.
  3. You can even share to the school social media site or upload to the class blog.

Some prompts to consider

  • “I god a cold”
  • The sneeze
  • Germs galore
  • What not to do when you’re sick!

 

Activity 2: Design a card


Someone in your class is sick. Design and write a Get Well card to send to them.

Lesson

8

Stop! Colds and flu alert

Help STOP the spread of Cold and Flu viruses in your classroom – putting it all together

 

Learning purpose:

  • Teach recommended health guidelines to help stop the spread of viruses.
  • Put together a targeted health awareness campaign for the school population.

Recommended Year levels
Years 4, 5, 6 and 7

News flash! Winter 2017 colds and flu season has started

Your class has been given the responsibility of creating an awareness campaign about this year’s cold and flu season for the entire school. That might include presenting daily news bulletins and updates so that kids can protect themselves and their families.

 

It will have four major components and you will need to do some research first on symptoms, prevention, and what to do if you are feeling sick. There are useful information websites below.


Activities

  1. With a partner, write a short announcement that will be broadcast over the school PA system. Keep it short (under 2 minutes) and make sure that you remember to finish with the important message of Catch it, Bin it, Wash it! You could also pre-record it.
  2. Create a short role-play and/or film about how to prevent catching colds and flu. You will perform or play it at the weekly assembly.
  3. Create posters for the school’s hallways, reminding everyone about how to prevent spreading germs and viruses.
  4. Create a post for the class or school blog, reminding parents about the three-step way to prevent colds and flu. You could also upload your health video message there too.

 

Useful information websites

Kids Health

Better Health Channel

Women and Children’s Health Network

Brainpop 

Health for Kids

This section contains extra classroom material that you can download and print. These include a display poster, letter for parents explaining the Sneezesafe® program and a certificate for the students to recognise that they are now Sneezesafe®!

Poster

The poster carries the key message of the Sneezesafe® program – Catch it, Bin it, Wash it.

Extra ideas:

  • Discuss the message and ask them why each of the ‘three rules’ (use a tissue for blowing your nose and for covering sneezes and coughs; throw it in the bin; wash your hands promptly) is important.
  • Divide the class into groups of three; each group will work out a role-play demonstrating one of the ‘rules’.
  • Design a poster, brochure or put together a PowerPoint presentation with a message promoting good health.
  • In pairs, work out a simple script, plan a backdrop and record a ‘daily health report’ using the classroom digital cameras.

 

Certificate

At the beginning of the Sneezesafe® program, show the children the certificate they will receive at the end. It will be presented to recognise the learnings that they have achieved:

  • Follow the three rules in class.
  • Show that they can use tissues properly.
  • Understand how germs are spread.
  • Wash their hands correctly.
  • Complete the activities for their year level.

 

To show what they have been learning, the class could demonstrate to the whole school assembly how germs spread, using the ‘painted hands’ activity.

 

Letter to parents

The letter to parents will alert them to the classroom Sneezesafe® program, and explain about respiratory hygiene and tissue use so that the good habits children are learning in the program are reinforced at home. It will also remind parents to provide their children with a supply of pocket tissues so they will always have a tissue on hand when they need it.

  • Parents can support classroom activities by talking with their children about ways to stay healthy and avoid catching a cold.
  • Parents can view the online games and stories and play them with their children to help reinforce good tissue habits at home.
  • The back of the letter includes information about the home competition for children. Students have a chance to win one of fifteen iPad Mini 2.